Science Essay Examples

  • Tomb Effigy Of Jaquelin De Ferriere

    932 words - 4 pages

    The Tomb Effigy of Jaquelin deFerriere (Limestone, North French, late 13th century) is unusual in style for the time and place in which it was created. In the 13th century, Gothic art in France consisted of more three dimensional sculpture and more of a variety in the poses of the figures than in the Romanesque period which preceded it. The Tomb Effigy of Jaquelin deFerriere falls into the transition period between the Romanesque (11th- 12th century) and Gothic time-frames (12th- 15th century), which may contribute to its flat, simple, linear appearance. Its appearance is not exactly

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    What Do You Want From College

    183 words - 1 page

    There are three main categories of things that can be gained in a life experience. We can gain materially, gain in our personality, and gain knowledge. According to our goals we pick which we want more of. I want nothing of the first except to aid my approach to the third. The second will happen as it must over time, and I can't really guess what will be gained or lost there. So what there is left to tell you about is the knowledge I want. All knowledge that I might want is subsidiary to the main piece of knowledge I seek. I am after the meaning of life. All other concer

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    A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment

    1909 words - 8 pages

    Shakespeare?s ?Macbeth? and Dostoevsky?s Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a dr

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    Influences Of Geofrey Chaucher

    807 words - 4 pages

    Of all the prominent Italian writers that influenced Geoffrey Chaucer, Dante and Boccaccio had the greatest impact on his literary works. Though others, such as Petrarch, also influenced Chaucer, none did so to the extent of Dante and Boccaccio (Brewer pg.13). In the fourteenth century, Italy led European culture. The most highly organized cities, the biggest industries, the richest merchants and bankers, the best doctors, the most innovational technicians, the best painters and sculptors, the finest vernacular poets, and the mo

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    Philosophy Davide Hume

    2955 words - 12 pages

    Hume's Life David Hume was the son of a minor Scottish landowner. His family wanted him to become a lawyer, but he felt an "insurmountable resistance to everything but philosophy and learning". Mr. Hume attended Edinburgh University, and in 1734 he moved to a French town called La Fleche to pursue philosophy. He later returned to Britain and began his literary career. As Hume built up his reputation, he gained more and more political power. Hume's Philosophy HUME'S WRITINGS In 1742, Hume wrote Essays Moral and Political. Then in 1748, he wrote An Enquiry Concerning

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    Philosophy Hume

    2119 words - 9 pages

    In explaining Hume?s critique of the belief in miracles, we must first understand the definition of a miracle. The Webster Dictionary defines a miracle as: a supernatural event regarded as to define action, one of the acts worked by Christ which revealed his divinity an extremely remarkable achievement or event, an unexpected piece of luck. Therefore, a miracle is based on one?s perception of past experiences, what everyone sees. It is based on a individuals own reality, and the faith in which he/she

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    Philosophy Mills Utilitarianism

    1471 words - 6 pages

    Mill's Utilitarianism: Sacrifice the innocent for the common good? When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and in evaluating the consequentialist issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experie

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    Philosophy Plato

    2042 words - 9 pages

    Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens, Greece. When he was a child his father, Ariston, who was believed to be descended from the early kings of Athens died, and his mother, Perictione married Pyrilampes. As a young man Plato was always interested in political leadership and eventually became a disciple of Socrates. He followed his philosophy and his dialectical style, which is believed to be the search for truth through questions, answers, and additional questions. After witnessing the death of Socrates at the hands of the Athenia

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    Philosophy Socrates

    637 words - 3 pages

    Philosophy is a vast field. It examines and probes many different fields. Virtue, morality, immortality, death, and the difference between the psyche (soul) and the soma (body) are just a few of the many different topics which can be covered under the umbrella of philosophy. Philosophers are supposed to be experts on all these subjects. The have well thought out opinions, and they are very learned people. Among the most revered philosophers of all time was Socrates. Living around the 5th century B.C., Socrates was among the first philoso

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    Philosophy Socrates View Of Love

    1121 words - 5 pages

    A Different View of Love We have heard definitions of love through our lives that have been passed on for decades. Some of us have felt love, and some of us have been in love. But no one ever seems to question what love is, as if it is something that just plainly is. People tend to just go with it, and think that what they are feeling is really complete and substantial love. In Plato?s The Symposium, the reader is confronted with some very different views of love as brought to us by Agathon, Phaedrus and Socrates, to name a

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    Philosophy The Only Truth Existing

    1151 words - 5 pages

    "We are, then, faced with a quite simple alternative: Either we deny that there is here anything that can be called truth - a choice that would make us deny what we experience most profoundly as our own being; or we must look beyond the realm of our "natural" experience for a validation of our certainty." A famous philosopher, Rene Descartes, once stated, "I am, [therefore] I exist." This statement holds the only truth found for certain in our "natural" experience that, as conscious beings, we exist. Whether we are our own creators,

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    Philosphy Mills Utilitarianism

    1471 words - 6 pages

    Mill's Utilitarianism: Sacrifice the innocent for the common good? When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and in evaluating the consequentialist issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experie

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    The Canterbury Tales The Knight S Tale

    819 words - 4 pages

    Abortion is a subject that is very controversial. It is legal to have an abortion, but in some people?s opinion it is an immoral act that should not be legal. In the Middle Ages the knights has a code of chivalry to live by, and it was a moral code. The knights really did not have a legal code because they were supposed to live up to the code of chivalry. Kings also had to follow these codes if they were to be considered a good King. In Chaucer?s The Canterbury Tales The Knight?s Tale represents what the code of chivalry stands for, this however is completed contrasted by Malory

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    The Grapes Of Wrath Economic Battle

    1300 words - 6 pages

    The Grapes of Wrath is a novel by John Steinbeck that exposes the desperate conditions under which the migratory farm families of America during the 1930's live under. The novel tells of one families migration west to California through the great economic depression of the 1930's. The Joad family had to abandon their home and their livelihoods. They had to uproot and set adrift because tractors were rapidly industrializing their farms. The bank took possession of their land because the owners could not pay off their loan. The novel sho

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    The Harrowing Of Hell Dialectic And Spectacle

    4580 words - 19 pages

    Roland Barthes's essay on "The World of Wrestling" draws analogically on the ancient theatre to contextualize wrestling as a cultural myth where the grandiloquence of the ancient is preserved and the spectacle of excess is displayed. Barthes's critique -- which is above all a rewriting of what was to understand what is -- is useful here insofar as it may be applied back to theatre as another open-air spectacle. But in this case, not the theatre of the ancients, but the Middle English pageant presents the locus for discussing the sport of presentation, or, if you prefer, the performan

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    The Masque Of The Red Death By Edgar Allen Poe

    366 words - 2 pages

    Edgar Allen Poe's ?The Masque of the Red Death? is an elaborate allegory that combines objects in the story with visual descriptions to give focus to the reader's imagination. In the story, a prince named Prospero tries to dodge the Red Death through isolation and seclusion. He hides behind impenetrable walls of his castellated abbey and lets the world take care of its own. But no walls can stop death because it is unavoidable and inevitable. Visual descriptions in the story are used to symbolize the death that came to a dark, unkind and ignorant prince. Prospero failed to see th

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    Aristotle

    334 words - 2 pages

    Although Aristotle was best know for his work in philosophy and the natural sciences, he was also a poet. Poetry, to the Greeks, included drama. Aristotle used the same methodology in poetry as he used in science. Aristotle made many contributions to the world, and much of his work still exists today. In 384/3 B.C., Aristotle was born in the small of Stagira. Stagira is located on the eastern coast of the peninsula of Chalcidice in Thrace. Aristotle?s father Nicomachus was a court physician and a friend of Amyntas II, the king of Macedon and

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    Leonardo Da Vinci

    286 words - 2 pages

    Leonardo da Vinci was one of the greatest inventor-scientist of recorded history. His genius was unbounded by time and technology, and was driven by his insatiable curiosity, and his intuitive sense of the laws of nature. Da Vinci was dedicated to discovery of truth and the mysteries of nature, and his insightful contributions to science and technology were legendary. As the archetypical Renaissance man, Leonardo helped set an ignorant and superstitous world on a course of reason, science, learning, and tolerance. He was an internationally renowned inv

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    Medieval Castles

    1565 words - 7 pages

    In 1494 the armies of the French king, Charles VIII, invaded Italy to capture the kingdom of Naples. They swept through the country and bombarded and destroyed many castles. This invasion signaled the end of the castle as a stronghold of defense. For centuries it had been the dominant fortification in Western Europe for the defense of kings, nobility, and townspeople. Ancient cities were often walled to keep out invaders, and within the walls there was usually a citadel, a strongly built fortification occupying the highest or militarily most advantageous position. A castle i

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    The Hellenic Period

    1015 words - 5 pages

    During the Greek Golden Age, art and philosophy expressed hellenic "weltanschauung", their unique outlook on the world and way of life. Through the works of artists, playwrights, and philosophers, one can see both sides of the conflicted systems of the world, such as; good vs. evil, order vs. chaos, stability vs. flux, relativism vs. absolutism and balance and harmony. The Greeks were materialists. They adopted the philosophical doctrine which says that physical matter is the only reality in the universe; everything else, including thought, feeling, mind and will can be ex

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    My Philosophy Of Education

    1375 words - 6 pages

    My own philosophy of education is rather difficult for me to explain. There are many parts of our educational system that I disagree with. The problem is that I see far too many problems, yet offer few answers. Today?s educational systems seem so trendy and political. It almost seems like we should not get comfortable with any one way of doing things because policies and procedures change so often. My own philosophy is one that many people have heard of, ?If it?s not broken, then don?t fix it!?. This is simple, and so am I. Upon readi

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    Teaching Creationism In Schools

    1492 words - 6 pages

    The issue of teaching creationism in the public schools has long been debated. Over the years many different arguments have been made. First creationists tried to have the teaching of evolution outlawed. This issue went to the Supreme Court in 1968, where in _Epperson v. Arkansas_ the high court ruled against banning the teaching of evolution. Soon after this decision creationists began to call for 'equal time', or the equal treatment of creation theory and evolution theory. When this attempt also failed creationists turned to 'creation science' (Grunes 465). Today the major argument

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    Chivalry

    826 words - 4 pages

    Chivalry When I first think of chivalry, I think of knights and dragons and damsels in distress. It's not really something that I associate with the society that we live in today. You've heard it before, chivalry is dead. But I don't really believe that. It's too final, it doesn't leave any room for us to be better people again. Chivalry isn't dead, it's napping. And I think it's time for us to wake it up. To me, chivalry isn't just about brave knights coming to rescue helpless princesses. It's having the courage to always do what you know is right, r

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    Toward A Sustainable Community

    1433 words - 6 pages

    Not until the spread of the Industrial Revolution in the late nineteenth century, has man possessed the ability to adversely alter, on a global scale, the geologic and climatic cycles that have existed for millennia. Planet earth, which man calls home, is approximately 5 billion years old. The science of paleontology tells us that man is a relative new comer to the planet. Modern man did not arrive on the scene until approximately 10,000 to 15,000 years ago. Developments in hunting, agriculture, literacy, and the sciences, have allowed man to thrive and inhabit nearly every corner of

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    Catching Dreams

    766 words - 4 pages

    Dreams are a window into the mind. These may be our most elaborate, distinctive, revealing, and flamboyant creations; they have fascinated us for thousands of years. The Egyptians built temples for dreaming. The oracles of Greece pondered cryptic dreams as the "royal road to the unconscious." Dreams allow us to view beyond that which we are and know in daily life; they hint of other dimensions of space and time. What do dreams really mean? Are they mirrors of your days, tunnels into pauses of the unconscious, or no more than the chance results of biological changes in the br

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    History Of Psychoanalysis

    887 words - 4 pages

    The history of the major discoveries in psychoanalysis is largely interwoven with the life and professional career of a single man, Sigmund Freud. The book Studies on Hysteria actually marks the beginning of psychoanalysis, although the term was not used by Freud until a year later (1896). Prior to this time, he spoke of ?Breuer?s cathartic method,? and occasionally of ?psychical analysis.? By 1896, Freud had made some notable changes in the original technique. For one thing, he had given up the use of hypnosis. He had found that some patients

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    Verbal Aggression

    1299 words - 6 pages

    Verbal aggression is message behavior which attacks a person's self-concept in order to deliver psychological pain.(Infante, 1995) Studies of verbal aggression have focused primarily on children and adolescents in educational and social settings. Very few studies were found to examine verbal aggression in adults in the workplace.(Ebbesen, Duncan, Konecni, 1974) The consequences of verbal aggression in the workplace can lead to social isolation, job related stress, health related problems, as well as problems in career advancement. It therefore should be considered important, for the

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    Acid Rain

    936 words - 4 pages

    Modern society is becoming overwhelmed with great amounts of pollution from cars, factories and an overabundance of garbage. The immense amounts of sulphur dioxide emitted into the air causes high levels of acid in the atmosphere. When this sulphuric acid is absorbed into moisture in the air, poignant rainfalls can be damaging to the external environment. Acid rain is destroying the world=s lakes, air and ecosystem. Acid rain is killing lakes and decreasing the number of inhabitants in these fresh water bodies. Acid rain causes an ample deduction in the pH levels in th

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    Air Pollution

    2631 words - 11 pages

    Introduction Air pollution is nothing new. Ever since the discovery of fire, less-than-desirable substances have been vented into the air. One of the first air-pollution regulations dates back to the fourteenth century, when King Edward I banned the burning of sea coal in lime kilns. U.S. air-pollution regulations have their roots in British Common Law. But regardless of those efforts, air pollution continues to be a serious local and world-wide problem. Pollution is the pressure within the air of one or more substances that are harmful to human health, welfare, animal or pl

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    Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

    1418 words - 6 pages

    The volleyball match has been going on for over an hour. Both teams have been trading points and side-outs. The ball is set high outside so that the big outside hitter can put the ball away. She comes in hard, plants, leaps into the air and smashes the ball down the line in a twisting motion. As she lands on her right leg, a POP is heard and down she goes. What has just happened is occurring more and more often in athletics, the athlete has just torn the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). In this paper I will describe ACL, how it is injured and diagnosed, how it be repaired and what

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    Anti Matter

    1283 words - 6 pages

    Introduction Ordinary matter has negatively charged electrons circling a positively charged nuclei. Anti-matter has positively charged electrons - positrons - orbiting a nuclei with a negative charge - anti-protons. Only anti-protons and positrons are able to be produced at this time, but scientists in Switzerland have begun a series of experiments which they believe will lead to the creation of the first anti-matter element -- Anti-Hydrogen. The Research Early scientists often made two mistakes about anti-matter. Some thought it had a negative mass, and would thus feel

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    Atmospheric Circulation And More

    773 words - 4 pages

    The global energy balance and atmospheric motion mainly determine the circulation of the earth's atmosphere. There is a hierarchy of motion in atmospheric circulation. Each control can be broken down into smaller controlling factors. The global energy balance is an equal balance of short-wave radiation coming into the atmosphere and long-wave radiation going out of the atmosphere. This is called thermal equilibrium. The earth is at thermal equilibrium; however, there can have a surplus or deficit of energy in parts of the h

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    Bioethics

    2110 words - 9 pages

    Bioethics, which is the study of value judgments pertaining to human conduct in the area of biology and includes those related to the practice of medicine, has been an important aspect of all areas in the scientific field (Bernstein, Maurice, M.D.). It is one of the factors that says whether or not certain scientific research can go on, and if it can, under which rules and regulations it must abide by. One of the most recent and controversial issues facing our society today is the idea of cloning. On February 23, 1997, Ian Wilmut, a Scottish scienti

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    Composting And The Grocery Industry

    2485 words - 10 pages

    The following bulletin was prepared from Grocery Industry Committee on Solid Waste October 24, 1991 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Solid waste composting is an important component of an integrated solution for solid waste management. Composting can divert organic, compostable materials, not otherwise recycled, from the solid waste stream and convert them into a useful product. Composting is environmentally sound, technically and economically feasible and meets local waste management needs. This report, from the Grocery Compost Task Force to the Grocery Industry Committee on Solid Waste (GICS

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    Descartes Sixth Meditation

    1432 words - 6 pages

    In his sixth meditation must return to the doubts he raised in his first meditation. In this last section of his sixth meditation he deals mainly with the mind-body problem; and he tries to prove whether material things exist with certainly. In this meditation he develops his Dualist argument; by making a distinction between mind and body; although he also reveals their rather significant relationship. Primarily he considers existence of the external world and whether our experience hold knowledge of this world or whether this knowledge is mer

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    Does The Human Genome Project Affect The Moral Standards Of Society

    1379 words - 6 pages

    Does the Human Genome Project affect the moral standards of society? Can the information produced by it become a beneficial asset or a moral evil? For example, in a genetic race or class distinction the use of the X chromosome markers can be used for the identification of a persons ethnicity or class (Murphy,34). A seemingly harmless collection of information from the advancement of the Human Genome Project. But, lets assume this information is used to explore ways to deny entry into countries, determine social class, or even who gets preferential treatment. Can the outcome of t

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    Eugenics

    283 words - 2 pages

    In the 1920?s there was a movement, called the melting pot, to solve the social problems of the time with the use of technology. Eugenics is the use of science to solve social problems. A major leader in eugenics at the turn of the century was a man named Davenport. Kallikak studied eugenics too. He used case studies of individuals to show heredity. He showed how people inherited their bad and good traits from their family. Eugenics was mostly concerned with social traits. Social traits are traits individuals have that affect society. Pedigrees were used in eugenics to examin

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    Evolution

    8833 words - 36 pages

    INTRODUCTION Theories explaining biological evolution have been bandied about since the ancient Greeks, but it was not until the Enlightment of the 18th century that widespread acceptance and development of this theory emerged. In the mid 19th century english naturalist Charles Darwin - who has been called the "father of evolution" - conceived of the most comprehensive findings about organic evolution ever1. Today many of his principles still entail modern interpretation of evolution. I've assessed and interpreted the basis of Darwin's theories on evolution, incorporati

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    Evolutionism VS Creationism

    1117 words - 5 pages

    Questions on the origin of life and of the universe must have challenged human curiosity and imagination as soon as early man had time for activities other than survival. In 1859, Charles Darwin published the Origin of Species, and since then, people have debated between the creationism and evolutionism theories. The theory of evolution has been supported only through various religious writings, particularly the Bible. Creationists believe in a divine creator, God. Creationism has a broad range of beliefs involving a reliance on God?s miraculous work to explain the origin of

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    Fractal Geometry

    1443 words - 6 pages

    ?Fractal Geometry is not just a chapter of mathematics, but one that helps everyman to see the same old world differently". - Benoit Mandelbrot The world of mathematics usually tends to be thought of as abstract. Complex and imaginary numbers, real numbers, logarithms, functions, some tangible and others imperceivable. But these abstract numbers, simply symbols that conjure an image, a quantity, in our mind, and complex equations, take on a new meaning with fractals - a concrete one. Fractals go from being very simple equations on a p

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    Hurricanes

    617 words - 3 pages

    Hurricanes get their start over the warm tropical waters of the North Atlantic Ocean near the equator. Most hurricanes appear in late summer or early fall, when sea temperatures are at their highest. The warm waters heats the air above it, and the updrafts of warm, moist air begin to rise. Day after day the fluffy cumuli form atop the updrafts. But the cloud tops rarely rise higher than about 6,000 feet. At that height in the tropics, there is usually a layer of warm, dry air that acts like an invisible ceiling or lid. Once in a while, something happens in the upper a

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    Light Waves

    478 words - 2 pages

    In this universe there are many thing that we cannot explain. Among these many things is light. Light, as far as we know, come in different wavelengths and the size of the wavelength determine what type of light it is. The middle wavelength lights are what gives us the seven basic colors of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. Beside these visible lights there are the lights that cannot be seen by the human eye. These invisible lights can be grouped into two other groups the long waves and short waves. The first group of waves is the longer wavelength of lig

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    Nanotechnology

    2421 words - 10 pages

    Curtis Shephard Nanotechnology: Immortality or total annihilation? Technology has evolved from ideals once seen as unbelievable to common everyday instruments. Computers that used to occupy an entire room are now the size of notebooks. The human race has always pushed for technological advances working at the most efficient level, perhaps, the molecular level. The developments and progress in artificial intelligence and molecular technology have spawned a new form of technology; Nanotechnology. Nanotechnology could g

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    Nitrate Contamination Of Groundwater Poses A Serious Health Threat

    1704 words - 7 pages

    Nitrates contamination of the world's underground water supply poses as a potentially serious health hazard to the human inhabitants on earth. High nitrate levels found in well water has been proven to be the cause for numerous health conditions across the globe. If we intend to provide for the future survival of man, and life on planet earth, we must take action now to assure the quality of one of our most precious resources, our underground water supply. Ground water can be defined as the water stored in the open spaces

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    Physics Relevance

    348 words - 2 pages

    By hottim[email protected] One aspect of physics in my life is gravity. Whenever I loose my balance, whether I'm on a bike, walking, or trying to stand on one leg, I will fall down. This is because every mass is attracted to every other mass, so my body is attracted to the earth, and the earth is attracted to my body, only not as much, because my body has a much smaller mass than the earth. This is also why when I drop something; it falls down, instead of just floating there like it would in space. This is very important in my life, because if I am not caref

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    Simeon Poisson Biography

    294 words - 2 pages

    Simeon Poisson's most important works were a series of papers on definite integrals and his advances in Fourier series. Originally forced to study medicine, Poisson began to study mathematics in 1798 at the Ecole Polytechnique. His teachers Laplace and Lagrange were to become friends for life. A memoir on finite differences, written when Poisson was 18, attracted the attention of Legendre. Poisson taught at Ecole Polytechnique from 1802 until 1808 when he became an astronomer at Bureau des Longitudes. In 1809 he was appointed to the chair of pure mathematics in the newly opened F

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    The Bengal Tiger

    1020 words - 5 pages

    The Bengal tiger is a carnivorous, mammal primarily from India. It lives in habitats such as the coniferous Himalayan Forest, the mangroves of the Sunderbans, the hills of the Indian Peninsula, or the forests of Rajasthan and Northern India. At one time Bengal tigers were scattered throughout Asia. Now they are generally found in India and some regions of Bangledesh, Bhutan, Nepal, and Myanmar. There is approximately 4,000 alive in the wild now, and about 300 are in captivity in zoos around the

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    Theories Of The Origin Of The Moon

    1837 words - 8 pages

    The Moon is the only natural satellite of Earth. The distance from Earth is about 384,400km with a diameter of 3476km and a mass of 7.35*1022kg. Through history it has had many names: Called Luna by the Romans, Selene and Artemis by the Greeks. And of course, has been known through prehistoric times. It is the second brightest object in the sky after the Sun. Due to its size and composition, the Moon is sometimes classified as a terrestrial "planet" along with Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars.

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    Othello Iago

    659 words - 3 pages

    Iago has no conscience. He is an angry man and is happy to take down everyone around him to get what he wants: revenge. It is in Act 1, Scene 3, that he devises his evil plan. Here we can see inside Iago's mind. It is easy to see that his primary motivation is jealousy: jealousy that Othello may have slept with his wife, and jealousy that Othello chose Cassio over him. As he plots his revenge, it is clear Iago respects and cares for no one. (Act 1, Scene 3, 378-381) I hate the Moor, And it is thought abroad that ?twixt my sheets H'as done my o

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    Ethics

    1849 words - 8 pages

    In today?s world it is all too prevalent to see more and more people hungry to gain success at an ever-increasing rate. Modern culture can and indeed is labelled ?greedy? and ?thoughtless?. Through my relatively short time spent in business, I have encountered many of these types of people. But who are they hungry for? Who benefits from their thoughtlessness, and why do they do what they do? More importantly, who is to blame when things don?t go according to plan? These are all questions asked constantly in the business domain, questions that often seem to include the word ?eth

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